I began by laying out the end pieces for the flap control arm. I quickly realized that I would need to invest in a bi-metal band saw as the cutoff wheel I was using (10-in. table saw mounted) was not adequate for the task at hand...way too coarse of a cut!!  

After a quick trip to Harbor Freight I came home with a nice little band saw which works very well! 

Here are the two completed inboard flap actuation levers. 

Another view of the same piece. The hole for the spring has not been drilled up to final size yet.

This view shows the reinforcing washer for the spring attach hole.

Here I have started the inboard flap drive arm. I do not have a brake large enough to bend .063" so I used a piece of 1/2" steel stock clamped up in my vise and then bend the flanges with a hammer. The process worked Ok but not a well as it would have in a brake.

Here are the pieces for the two hinge bearings that will be welded onto the flap support arm. After all of my careful measuring and cutting, when I started to weld these pieces up, I realized I had made a crucial mistake. Unlike aluminum fabrication (by riveting), you have to make allowances for shrinkage! I threw away two hinge assemblies before I was happy with the finished product. 

I continued on with making the parts for the hinge bearing but I was having so much fun cutting on my new band saw that I neglected to take into account the hole that needed to be drilled. Since I had already cut out the sides of each hinge, I simply screwed each side onto a piece of wood and then clamped the wood onto my drill press for the hole drilling step. I recommend to drill the holes BEFORE you cut out each hinge side!

Flap Support Tube

Here are two of the smaller end pieces (plans show them as ends #2) after forming but without drilling the two holes which go into each piece.

From a local steel salvage yard, I obtained a nice little piece of 3/4" steel stock, 2" x 9" to use as a form block. I beveled the edges to obtain a good radius and then clamped my first piece into my vise and started hammering away. Well, that action led to another trip to Harbor Freight for a bigger vise! I purchased a 6" vise that was on sale and found it worked quite well.
I bent this end piece after I had cut the hole and it worked OK, although I plan to make the next piece without cutting the hole first. I'll update which method I liked the best.

Update: After making a couple more pieces, I've decided I prefer to form the channel first and then cut the holes.

Well, as I was nearing the end of the wing rib fabrication stage, I decided to take a short break from lightning hole flanging and play around with the steel portion of these wings; you know, just to break up the monotony! 

I started by purchasing the "Wing Steel" kit offered by Wicks Aircraft and taking some time to study the appropriate plans. When the steel arrived, I felt ready to jump right in and get started.

Wing Steel

The next step was to fit and attach the support brace for the linkage arm.

Here is a view of the linkage am welded onto the aileron support tube.

Here are the two completed aileron support tubes.

Next I fabricated the two flap drive linkages. Note the bushing that slides inside of the "T" in the linkages. Just in case you were wondering, the polished sections on these tubes are not the result of grinding the welds rather I was cleaning off welding residue because  I had used alcohol as a cleaner instead of acetone. My suggestion...use acetone!

Next I started on the aileron control arms. I had previously formed the end pieces and made the cutout in the smaller one. I then fabricated the arm that will support the actuation linkage.

 

In this picture, the support tube has been welded to the end pieces, the stand-off for the pulley has already been installed, and the arm for the actuation linkage has been tack-welded in place. 

I began by laying out the end pieces for the flap control arm. I quickly realized that I would need to invest in a bi-metal band saw as the cutoff wheel I was using (10-in. table saw mounted) was not adequate for the task at hand...way too coarse of a cut!!  

After a quick trip to Harbor Freight I came home with a nice little band saw which works very well!


Aileron Support Tube

I fitted the parts into the tooling jig and welded it up. These are the completed flap control arms.

I decided I wanted grease fitting so I added a nut and a grease zerk to the hinge fitting.